Category: Teaching

The 21st century information environment

A little more than 10 years ago universities were graduating teachers who would work in schools where the principal information challenge was access. Now that most classrooms have networked computers with Internet access, the information economy of education has been inverted and the information challenge has become one of selection rather than access (Albion & Maddux, 2007). When it is...

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Expand your “bad” vocabulary

Will Richardson, whom I’ve always thought made good sense, has posted about a script for removing bad words from pages in Firefox. The script is available as a JavaScript file complete with the list of “bad words” in plain text. Talk about a great aid to education. Want to know what words are regarded as “bad”? Well then, just look...

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This, that and the other

It’s Sunday night and I’m just now trying to pull together some thoughts about some things that I started reading on Friday night but have had to let wait because I had more pressing work and social engagements. Now I’m wondering how to make any sense of what is a very mixed bag of posts I marked as I came...

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Digital Myopia – Online education as information pushing

My email today included a TOC alert for the Journal of Interactive Learning Research 16(4). There was more than one article that looked interesting enough to be followed up when I have a few minutes but one caught my eye and demanded immediate attention: Herrington, J., Reeves, T. C., & Oliver, R. (2005). Online learning as information delivery: digital myopia....

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Blogging and learning

Will Richardson at Weblogg-ed – The Read/Write Web in the Classroom has posted a reflection in which he brings together recent posts by George Siemens and Barbara Ganley. The Siemens post that he cites offers some explanation of connectivism as a theory of learning, distinct from other theories such as constructivism. Connectivism does not replace other modes of learning but...

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Podcast Theory Gap

E-Learning Queen writes about the Podcast Theory Gap: Online learners seem to prefer using audio and web-based information in ways that counter what researchers recommend. Although instructional designers do not often like to mention this, the fact is, it is the rare learner who will sit at a computer and willingly watch a 20 or 30-minute presentation. However, the same...

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Chance encounters

One of the quirks of publishing course materials through the official channels of DeC (Distance and e-Learning Centre) at USQ has been that materials are revised each year and, whether the changes are major or minor, the publication date appears as the year in which the course is offered. In other words, it is not possible to know from the...

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SITE 2005

This post is something of a departure from my usual quick notes about other sites. It’s a very minor revision of my mandated report to the Faculty on conference travel. I spent the week from 26 Feb to 7 Mar traveling and attending SITE 2005 – the 16th Annual Meeting of the Society for Information Technology in Teacher Education in...

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Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age

George Siemens writing in the International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning concludes: A real challenge for any learning theory is to actuate known knowledge at the point of application. When knowledge, however, is needed, but not known, the ability to plug into sources to meet the requirements becomes a vital skill. As knowledge continues to grow and evolve,...

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